Sterilizer – Self-Titled

With Sterilizer, multi-instrumentalist and producer Brandon Duncan explores some incredibly harsh industrial metal.

Wilting Sun – Self-Titled

Some strange and relaxing drone and experimental music on this new Wilting Sun album here. While Wilting Sun is careful not to step into anything too accessible, there’s quite a bit of variety on the six tracks here. Some tracks, like the intro here, deliver a mind-numbing drone, but manage to maintain an unsettling atmosphere pregnant with tension. Other moments sound like they’re pulled straight out of the Tim Hecker or Boards of Canada playbook, combining beautifully haunting melodies with soul-crushing noise and fuzz . As the name implies, the music of Wilting Sun is apocalyptic, desolate, and an ideal soundtrack for the end times.

Kijinoise – Kijinoise XIV

Here’s something that caught my ears while wading through Bandcamp earlier today. Kijinoise is a Chinese musician who has been uploading projects quite prolifically since late last month, using solely a guitar to deliver a fuzzy fusion of drone, noise, progressive rock, doom, and free improvisational elements. The results haven’t been totally mind-blowing thus far, but I must say the textures of this self-titled debut are actually quite nice, almost achieving a Sunn O)))-level heaviness at points. Find this guy a label! In the meantime, I’ll just wait a few more days for another release.

Update: It appears as though all the above linked projects have been consolidated into this first one, since renamed Kijinoise XIV.

Clark – “The Grit In The Pearl”

English electronic music producer Christopher Clark just released his latest full-length on Warp Records this month. It’s self-titled. Of the songs I’ve heard thus far, I’m finding it much more experimental and intriguing than his last album, Iradelphic, and “The Grit In The Pearl” is moment that must be highlighted.

The bouncy, overlapping synth leads are complimented with a driving kick drum that really brings clarity and order to the track as it continues to build this amorphous wall of reverb-slathered tones. It’s focused, but incredibly explorative as well–especially with that noisy drone in the song’s second half.

Royal Blood – Self-Titled

Royal Blood’s debut album may contain some hot singles, but the music itself is dying for a refreshing, distinct idea.

AHRM – Self-Titled

Praise to this up-and-coming band from Sweden. Their name: AHRM. They’ve got a debut, self-titled album on Bandcamp here, and it’s a barnburner. Punchy, sharp drums combined with some impassioned vocals and blaring guitars. It’s as informed by hardcore punk as it is the moodier, darker side of post-punk.

Börn – Self-Titled

Some twisted, eerie, raw, nasty, and misbehaved post-punk coming from Iceland’s Börn. Definitely a record for those who dig their rock on the dark side of things; because this record reeks of goth rock.

The guitar chords run pretty dreary, but the vocals are sharp, wailing, and strange. Nice contrast on there, and some great punk-y grooves are running throughout these tracks, too. Enjoy!

Antemasque – Self-Titled

Omar Rodriguez Lopez and Cedric Bixler-Zavala are back with a new project: Antemasque.

Antemasque – Self-Titled

The debut full-length from Antemasque is finally out! There’s been a lot of buzz building behind the album of this technically new band, but the project’s two lead members have pretty strong reputations in the world of rock music. Thanks to bands like At the Drive-In and Mars Volta, there’s really no reason a modern rock fan should be a stranger to Omar Rodríguez-López and Cedric Bixler-Zavala. This latest project of theirs is one of their most straightforward efforts, too. It definitely surpasses the last Volta album in terms of accessibility and hook power, I think.

If you’re in the mood for some “NO BS” rock tunes with some strong lead vocals, try this out.

Shivers – Self-Titled

Dark ambient, jazz, noise, and a strong sense of uncontrollable fear come together on this new, self-titled Shivers album. The trio features the musical input of Rutger Zuydervelt, Gareth Davis and Leo Fabriek. They’ve collaborated before, but this is the first time they’re doing so under this particular name. The final result, a.k.a. this album, is challenging, but surprisingly brief in its length. It would seem these guys wanna get straight to the heart of what these noisy, drone-jazz fusions are all about.

Look for this album on Miasmah.