PUJOL – “Pitch Black”

Next month, singer-songwriter PUJOL, a.k.a. Daniel Lucca, will be dropping his next full-length album, KLUDGE via Saddle Creek. While I wasn’t really huge on his past few full-lengths, the tracks I’ve been hearing from this latest effort of his seems to show a significant improvement on the songwriting side of things.

Sure, PUJOL’s rough, slightly lo-fi aesthetic still remains on his latest material, and that’s gonna turn some people off, but I think the melodies and sweet chorus on “Pitch Black” shines through the grime. It’s power pop magic. It’s rock ‘n’ roll, baby

Alright, I’ll end this now before I embarrass myself any further. Enjoy!

Carla Bozulich – Boy

Bringing together elements of folk, blues, experimental rock, and noise, Carla Bozulich makes one of the most unorthodox singer-songwriter records you’ll hear this year.

Mastodon – “High Road”

Mastodon comes through with a new single that pleases and pummels. I’m definitely digging it more than most of what I heard on the Hunter a few years ago.

Twin Shadow – “To The Top”

The new single from George Lewis Jr., a.k.a. Twin Shadow, is pure power ballad mimicry. You might dig it if, you know, you’re into that sorta thing.

Jack White – “Lazaretto”

HAH! Jack really came through on this new one. At first, I was a little on the fence about this whole solo thing, but he’s really starting to convince me on this latest single of his, “Lazaretto.”

Yeah, I understand that his voice, guitar tone, songwriting style hasn’t exactly done a 180 since the demise of the White Stripes–which you could argue he had an incredible amount of control over, making it a solo project in a sense–but I think Jack comes through with a decent track and some flashy accompaniment from organ, horns, and some glitchy synths as well. Since going #1 with Blunderbuss, he’s obviously making more instrumental strides and sending that ambition through the roof.

And that fiddle solo? Don’t even hate.

If you didn’t already know, Mr. White has a new album titled Lazaretto dropping on June 10th.

Cloud Nothings – Here And Nowhere Else ft. Sami Jarroush

I collaborate with the RIO!B’s Sami Jarroush on this review of the latest Cloud Nothings album.

Sleaford Mods – Singles Collection

Musically minimal and verbally maximal, this singles collection from Sleaford Mods is one of the oddest things I’ve come into contact with in the past month. Yeah, it sounds a lot like the Fall, but their use of drum machines and loops definitely sets them apart from them and any similar post-punk act. Not only that, but there seems to be a strong emphasis on societal satire in the lyrics, which is something I’m sure a Future of the Left fan an appreciate.

I could make numerous comparisons, but the insane rants and unadulterated rage displayed on this album is uniquely hilarious. The poetry behind the lyrics is actually pretty clever as well. Not bad for a set of tracks that sound like they were pulled together on a shoestring budget.

Also, I gotta tell you that these guys are actually planning on dropping a new record on April 28th titled Divide and Exit, which you can stream the first single from here. It sounds like they might actually be going for a fuller sound on this new record, which I’m very excited to hear!

En-fucking-joy!

Sorry, it just seemed appropriate.

Geronimo! – “Mr. President”

A wild, wordy, and riff-y track from Geronimo! titled “Mr. President.” It comes form the band’s next LP, Cheap Trick, which is dropping on May 13th via Exploding In Sound–you know, the home of my dude’s in Pile.

What his song doesn’t have in finesse, it makes up for in raw energy. The lyrics border on insane ramblings, and the tone of ‘em actually reminds me a bit of that new Big Ups album I loved recently. That makes me even more excited for this thing! Enjoy!

Liars – “Mess on a Mission”

“Facts Are Fiction”

In the first music video in support of Mess, Liars reduce, deconstruct, and distort reality via a repetitious, cycled sequence of the trio, placed in the midst of an anarchic situation, slowly retreating backwards up a set of steps. With the end of each cycle comes some form of camera trickery, whether it be a different viewing angle, different computer-generated surroundings and props, or the blurring together of previously-seen elements in a sort of glitchy artifact soup. It’s a genius concept that perfectly matches the amped-up aesthetic of the album. It doesn’t do much good trying to explain it, though; so go on and press the play button right up there – and be prepared for the ensuing perceptual overload.

“What A Mess”

Mess is out now, and in case you haven’t heard, or forgot, it’s awesome:

Ought – “Habit” (Premiere)

Recent Constellation Records signees Ought have just dropped the first song to be released from their forthcoming debut LP on the legendary Montreal label. The album is dropping on April 29th, and is titled More Than Any Other Day.

Admittedly, I’m a bit of a sucker for wordy rock ‘n’ roll with eccentric vocalists. I occasionally have to remind myself to really wonder if what I’m hearing is actually good, or if the band in question is just scratching some insatiable itch of mine.

Yes, Ought does scratch that itch, but I think there’s something truly genuine and moving about the slow-burning instrumentation and erratic vocal delivery of “Habit.” Singer Tim Beeler’s voice doesn’t feel too different from that of a young David Byrne, and the guitars on this track sound like something out of a Midwestern emo release from the mid-90s. The instrumentation grows in intensity as the music progresses, and the band lifts these guitars and drums with some wonderful strings and electric piano.

At the finish line, “Habit” gets pretty noisy. I suppose the wailing strings and repeated shouts of “I FEEL A HABIT FORMING,” are giving off “Heroin” vibes as well. And that’s not just an aesthetic comparison either, because Ought creates a similar kind of magic, I think. Enjoy!