Unsacred – False Light

The Richmond, VA-based trio Unsacred have just released their debut LP on Forcefield Records, and you can stream it in full above.

While the band channel a few different styles of heavy music throughout the album, they don’t really blend them together as much as transition back and forth between them. Although the music is at once identifiable as black metal, moments of crust-punk and hardcore flit in and out of each track. This stylistic variation is mostly achieved via the drumming, often trading astonishingly rapid blast-beats for more mid-tempo punk cadences, with the occasional D-beat gallop thrown in. Staying consistent throughout are the tortured, throat-full-of-nails vocals and the menacing, sepulchral guitar riffs (which sometimes feel straight out of the Watain playbook). The record as a whole can sometimes feel a bit repetitive, but it’s fun to get a Trash Talk vibe one moment, and hear echoes of Dark Funeral the next.

You can purchase the LP from Forcefield Records here.

-Tom Fullmer

 

Krill – “Torturer”

Melding elements of punk rock, loads of both metal and garage rock influences and a dash of poppy, melodic lyrics and undertones, Krill’s “Torturer” from the forthcoming album A Distant Fist Unclenching is rousing and bludgeoning, yet focused in its wild need to be experimental. The songs explodes with a spirit of desire and longing in the words and in the music in specific spots, leaving open a wide array of interpretation of the songs’ central meaning. At around 3:30 in, a grating, shredding guitar takes center stage and brings “Torturer” to a whole new level, and then the music drops down again for a more subversive ending to the tune than we were probably expecting. “Torturer” is the sound of a band with a few years under their collective belts, but still striving to find that signature sound. It’s a spirited outing for this Boston trio and should get more people talking about and sharing their music.

A Distant Fist Unclenching is due out 17 February via Exploding in Sound.

- Ron Grant

Guerilla Toss – “367 Equalizer” (Video)

Often, Guerilla Toss is revered as one of the noisier, more comprehensive American punk bands, with screeching vocals and wide instrumentals that makes up for what it lacks in melody with drive, energy and chaos. “367 Equaliser” is the comparatively quite friendly track, released earlier this year, which now features a music video that is as bizarre as the song is groovy (which is a lot). The drumming is relaxed, the bassline is funky, the singing is more controlled than usual, and overall the song seems to have been more thoughtful and direct, which a big change for a band whose bassist usually likes to take his pants off on stage. The video features moving animations which often mesh and weave into the next. The animations themselves are basic and totally abstract, which lends to the independent art idea that I think they set out to achieve. The song and video are a subtly well thought out combination, and is certainly a league above the previous attempt for the track “Drip Decay” in 2013. Perhaps the group are channelling their creativity more towards the art side than the punk in their widening genre spectrum – but either way, the results are interesting.

- Fin Worrall

YUNOREVIEW: NOVEMBER 2014

The magical monthly segment where I briefly touch down on a gauntlet of albums I didn’t get a chance to review this past month. These are just my short, straightforward, passionate, biased opinions.

These are the albums I touch down on:
Killjoy Club – Reindeer Games
Grouper – Ruins
Wiley – Snakes & Ladders
This Will Destroy You – Another Language
Cannibal Corpse – A Skeletal Domain
Gerard Way – Hesitant Alien
Twin Peaks – Wild Onion
Nachtmystium – The World We Left Behind
At The Gates – At War With Reality
The Contortionist – Language
Jessie Ware – Tough Love

Days N’ Daze – Rogue Taxidermy

I may not be about that folk punk life, but I can certainly enjoy the music, can’t I?

Days N’ Daze is a Houston, TX band–because they’re too punk for Austin–and they’ve been putting out records since the late 00s–so Rogue Taxidermy isn’t their first rodeo, and it doesn’t sound it either. The band’s got some pretty obvious influences: Gogol Bordello, Johnny Hobo, early Against Me!, Choking Victim, Andrew Jackson Jihad, and maybe some Defiance, Ohio. However, the playing here is fantastically tight, and they know their way around a song, too. These guys have a rough outer shell, but their righteous lyrics, solid structures, and sticky melodies leave a sweet aftertaste.

Obnox – “Infinite Trash”

If one thing can be said about Bim Thomas, a.k.a. Obnox, it’s that he’s come far–really far. Having gone from the ‘blues-grunge recorded on a four-track in his basement’ sound of debut album I’m Bleeding Now to the decidedly more proficient Louder Space, Obnox has explored, experimented and expanded into the quite alarming wall of sound to which we are now exposed with the new single “Infinite Trash.”

Because Obnox seems to have ignored that some of his most popular tracks from Louder Space were the most dynamically spacious, “Infinite Trash” is reminiscent of some of the louder, more punk-influenced songs from the album and seems to almost be a continuation of his earlier efforts. However, although it retains the full fuzzy guitar lines and grungy symbol crashes to which Obnox seems drawn, as well as the slightly tiresome self-harmonised vocals, this track seems a little more thought out, better produced and maybe even catchy.

- Fin Worrall

Child Abuse – “Straight Out Of Compton”

Stream / Download: Child Abuse – “Straight Out Of Compton”

As is the case with most avant-garde, noisy, progressive rock bands, you either get it or you don’t. Child Abuse leaves many who stumble upon the name wondering what on earth they could sound like, and I’m sure most check out one song and stop right there. Often, the bizarre, brutal, start-stop thrashing sound this band puts out leaves me sweating, a little scared.

As the name would suggest, Child Abuse is violent, almost to the point of being taboo. This violence is so unlike what one would find in metal or punk–the expected, almost controlled violence of a misunderstood teenager. Child Abuse’s sound is the worldly violence which surrounds us, making it like the soundtrack to Anthony Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange, a story of delinquents, psychos and terror-mongers. Trouble in Paradise is tighter than previous albums, as well as a little more thought-out, but the energy and horror is still as in-your-face as before. With gnarled, growling vocals, peculiar rhythms and harsh but almost futuristic melodies; the album causes intentional emotional discomfort, and if that’s your thing, you’re in for a treat.

Try a track from the album above, and enjoy!

- Fin Worrall

Pissed Jeans – “Boring Girls”

Last month, Pennsylvanian noise-rockers Pissed Jeans reissued their 2005 debut album Shallow on their current label Sub Pop. Definitely check this re-release out if you’ve been digging the group’s recent output and want to witness the genesis of their “power dirge” ways. Above you can watch the music video for the LP’s second track “Boring Girls,” an amusingly uncouth love song whose visuals are part sitcom satire and part cartoony surrealist horror. Enjoy!

Big Ups – “Not Today”

The lovable noise rockers over at Big Ups are teaming up with fellow Brooklynites Washer for a split 7″, due out November 18 via Exploding in Sound. Last week we shared the first track from Big Ups’ side, “Rash,” and now you can hear their second scathing offering, “Not Today,” above. Happy listening!

Guerilla Toss – Smack the Brick EP

Everybody’s favorite funked-out, rock-out-with-your-pud-out, no-wave five-piece Guerilla Toss is back and funkier than ever with this new four track EP, Smack the Brick. The project finds the Allston act continuing to tighten their compositions, evoking something like a primeval Talking Heads with their now rather danceable grooves. It’s a far cry from the improvised punk stylings of, say, the band’s self-titled Tzadik debut, but I think they’re doing a nice balancing act of loose and tight at the moment, so I can’t really complain. Besides, they apparently have a split thing with B L A C K I E coming up, which may well see the return of their more free-improvised side. Until then, check out Smack the Brick above and enjoy!