Dirty Beaches – “Time Washes Away Everything”

Dirty Beaches has been laid to rest, but Alex Zhang Hungtai remains a wanderer. In the statement that accompanies swansong Stateless, he comments on the transitory and unpredictable nature of life and prompts us to “brace ourselves for the ever changing tides of time.” Above, find the profoundly affective audio-visual representation of this rather melancholy existential mindset. Godspeed to us all as we wander through this life!

Stateless is out now via Zoo Music.

Jason Lescalleet – This Is What I Do, Vol. Three

Jason Lescalleet is coming forward as a proponent for the virtue of instant gratification with monthly/quarterly subscription series This Is What I Do (deets on his Glistening Examples website).

In an interview with Tiny Mix Tapes, the musique concrète virtuoso touched down on the value of immediacy in music: “Part of this project’s value comes from the immediacy of the material… Immediacy means that I won’t have time to over think anything. Raw. Pure. Also, timely, current, now. A glimpse into my state of mind on a real time basis. Keeping it real.”

You might recall Lescalleet teaming up with Kevin Drumm to suck listeners into an inescapable void of emptiness and beauty earlier this year with The Abyss. If that’s not real, I don’t know what is. Help Lescalleet keep it real – check out last month’s This Is What I Do above and if it’s your bag, consider following the series as it makes its way into the new year. Enjoy!

 

Clark – Self-Titled

Clark heads back into familiar territory on his new self-titled album.

Andy Stott – Faith in Strangers

Andy Stott explores more electornic subgenres on his latest full-length release.

Living In Frames – “Can’t Dream”

Previously mentioned Living In Frames has a new single titled “Can’t Dream,” and it’s a joyous exercise in ambient maximalism. There lies no subtlety in the wailing production on this song, nor should there be. Beginning with a beautiful and layered chord progression, the song consistently hints at dropping into dance territory. However, every time the booming steps threaten to overshadow the song–at 2:40 the song literally teases a 2010-esque dubstep drop–they quickly dissolve away again. Living In Frames is not afraid to employ every sound at his disposal: dark ghost vocals, harsh reverb, glittery synths to fill out the sound, but most importantly, an ear for incredible melodies.

- Garrett Cottingham

Black To Comm – Self-Titled

Black To Comm is the experimental music project of sonic adventurer Marc Richter. Since the mid-00s, Marc’s been dropping loads of albums, splits, and even he even released a Scott Walker-esque video installation soundtrack back in 2012. However, Richter is bringing the project back to its roots on this new self-titled release, venturing through the sounds of ambient music, drone, and tape music as well.

The soundscapes on this album are dense, creative, and difficult to penetrate. Some are more minimal or abrasive than others, but all are simultaneously beautiful and intriguing.

Pink Floyd – The Endless River

Pink Floyd has a new album. Whaaaaaaaaaaa?

Andy Stott – Faith In Strangers

UK electronic music producer Andy Stott comes through with a new record that further melds the worlds of techno and textured, noisy dark ambient music. You can stream Faith In Strangers above, which is getting released on Modern Love this week. Enjoy, and check out a review for Stott’s last full-length right here.

YUNOREVIEW: NOVEMBER 2014

The magical monthly segment where I briefly touch down on a gauntlet of albums I didn’t get a chance to review this past month. These are just my short, straightforward, passionate, biased opinions.

These are the albums I touch down on:
Killjoy Club – Reindeer Games
Grouper – Ruins
Wiley – Snakes & Ladders
This Will Destroy You – Another Language
Cannibal Corpse – A Skeletal Domain
Gerard Way – Hesitant Alien
Twin Peaks – Wild Onion
Nachtmystium – The World We Left Behind
At The Gates – At War With Reality
The Contortionist – Language
Jessie Ware – Tough Love

Wilting Sun – Self-Titled

Some strange and relaxing drone and experimental music on this new Wilting Sun album here. While Wilting Sun is careful not to step into anything too accessible, there’s quite a bit of variety on the six tracks here. Some tracks, like the intro here, deliver a mind-numbing drone, but manage to maintain an unsettling atmosphere pregnant with tension. Other moments sound like they’re pulled straight out of the Tim Hecker or Boards of Canada playbook, combining beautifully haunting melodies with soul-crushing noise and fuzz . As the name implies, the music of Wilting Sun is apocalyptic, desolate, and an ideal soundtrack for the end times.